CATALOG

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Florida School of Preaching. Sound Biblical teaching. Personal, caring instruction. Christian fellowship. Life-long friendships. Opportunities to learn, serve and develop your faith.

- Ted Wheeler

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Jan 2017 | Spring Semester Underway
Florida School of Preaching

 

General Information
Personnel
Admissions
Financial
Academic Information
Academic Standing
Code of Conduct
Special Training
Courses
Textbook & Materials


General Information

PURPOSE: The purpose of the Florida School of Preaching is to train preachers and Bible class teachers for the churches of Christ. There are men who desire to preach but have been deprived of a college education. Some have said this is the only way they can receive the needed training. This school encourages individuals to pursue education to the highest extent possible.

SCHOOL HISTORY: The Florida School of Preaching began in September 1969 as a work of the South Florida Avenue church of Christ in Lakeland with support from other churches and individuals. The school continues to use spacious facilities provided by this church. In June 1972 the school was issued a charter from the State.

LOCATION: The school is located in Central Florida within driving distance to the East and West coasts on Interstate 4, thereby making it easily accessible. Lakeland is one of the fastest growing communities in Florida, due primarily to its central location. Present statistics list a population of 85,517 in the city limits and approximately 500,000 in Polk county, with a considerable increase during the winter months due to visitors from other states. These figures were obtained from the Lakeland Ledger; Special Section, Page 8, Sunday March 23, 2003.

FACILITIES: The Florida School of Preaching is a major part of the work of the South Florida Avenue church of Christ in Lakeland. The eldership has graciously allowed the school to use its facilities. The building is of masonry and concrete construction. It is located on one acre of land and consists of 29 classrooms with a main auditorium seating capacity of about 400 people. There are two offices, a library, supply room, two main restrooms, two nurseries, and three water fountains located on the ground floor of the building. Proper heating and cooling are maintained by six units. Parking facilities are located adjacent to the main building.

In July 1981 a new facility was added for the use of the school, which expedites our work greatly. This new addition, with a floor plan 200 feet by 40 feet, is joined to the west side of the building described above. It provides for two large classrooms, an office, two supply rooms, one modern, well-furnished kitchen, a large fellowship, or assembly, room, and two large restrooms. It is equipped with its own heating and cooling system.

Personnel

BOARD OF DIRECTORS:

The school is governed by a Board of Directors. Those presently serving are: Ted Wheeler, Chairman; Brian R. Kenyon, Vice-Chairman; Tim Simmons, Secretary; Chad Tagtow, Treasurer; David Anderson; Steve Atnip; Bruce Daughtery; George K. French; Brian Kenyon, Director; Philip Lancaster; E. Robert McAnally; Uleysses Richardson and James H. Sullivan.

THE FACULTY:

Stephen C. Atnip earned a BA and an MA from Southern Christian University, and also graduated from the Bear Valley School of Biblical Studies. He has served as Principal, Black Creek Christian School and is the current preacher for the Black Creek church of Christ in Middleburg, FL. He serves on the Florida School of Preaching Board of Directors. He teaches Bible and Bible related subjects.

Bob Bauer attended both the University of Cincinnati and the Florida School of Preaching. He has preached for congregations in Florida beginning in1990 and is currently working with the Orange Street congregation in Auburndale, FL. He has been involved in mission campaigns to Ghana, West Africa since 1990 and has also done radio work. He currently writes a religious column for the Auburndale Sun. He teaches Bible and Bible related subjects.

Michael Elledge is a 1995 graduate of the Florida School of Preaching and previously attended Central Michigan University. He has also studied Sociology and English at Manatee Community College. From 1995 until 2001, he preached and conducted Gospel meetings and radio programs while working with the church in Alachua, Florida and then at the Midway church of Christ in Sarasota, Florida from 2001 to 2004. During 2004, he returned to the Alachua congregation as associate minister and youth director. He teaches Bible and Bible-related subjects.

Nathan Franson, has been preaching for the Kissimmee (Florida) church of Christ since 2009, the same year he graduated from the Memphis School of Preaching. He speaks at Gospel meetings and lectureships. He has written several articles along with a tract, Ten Questions to Ask a Mormon and has just completed a DVD containing information, photographs and a Power- Point lesson on Mormonism. He teaches Bible and Bible-related subjects.

Brian Kenyon, Director, is a graduate of the Florida School of Preaching (1991). He earned an AS in Underwater Technology from Florida Institute and Technology (1984) and from Freed-Hardeman University a BA in Bible and Philosophy (1993), and an MA in New Testament (1995). He has worked with churches in Louisiana, Tennessee, and Florida. He has worked on campaigns in Scotland and Jamaica. He teaches Bible, Greek, and Bible-related subjects.

Uleysses Richardson, has been preaching for the Southside church of Christ, Tampa, since 2005. He also serves on the school’s board of directors. He received formal education from Florida School of Preaching (1994 graduate), Maryland University, Tacoma, Washington, Branch (AA, 1982), and a certificate from Okaloosa Junior College, Fort Walton Beach, Florida (1977). He served twenty-six years in the United States Air Force. In his twenty-three years of preaching, he has also served congregations in Tennessee and New Mexico. He teaches Bible and Bible-related subjects.

Daniel Stearsman, serves as a deacon with the Orange Street church of Christ in Auburndale, FL. He is a pharmacist and an assistant professor in the Department of Bioethics, Medical Humanities, and Palliative Care in the College of Medicine at University of South Florida, Tampa. He received his formal education from Hillsborough Community College (AA, 1996), University of Florida College of Pharmacy (Doctor of Pharmacy, 2000), Southern Christian University (BA, 2005), University of South Florida College of Medicine (MABMH, 2009), and is currently enrolled in the graduate program at Bear Valley Bible Institute of Denver. He teaches Bible-related subjects.

Ted Wheeler is a graduate from the Florida School of Preaching (1984). Following graduation, he and his family worked with the church in Ghana, West Africa, for five years, building up existing congregations and establishing new ones in rural areas. He taught in the National Bible Institute, a preacher training school, in Accra. He has preached for the church of Christ in Venice since 1989, for whom he also serves as an elder. He continues to conduct annual campaigns to Ghana. He teaches Missions, Bible, and Bible related subjects.

OFFICE STAFF:

The school could not function as well as it does without the committed, skillful, and reliable ladies who diligently work “behind the scenes.” Bettye Bolding serves as the school’s secretary and Kathy Sweeney serves as the book keeper. Kathy Strickland and Dotty Gutzler willingly assist in times of special need.

Admissions

NON-DISCRIMINATORY POLICY:

The Florida School of Preaching admits students of any race, color, national, and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national, and/or ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan program, or other school administered programs.

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS:

Who may enroll? Any student of good character and right purpose, who is willing and able to do the work prescribed by the administration and faculty. No lines are drawn as to race or color. In view of the intensive and accelerated program, it is necessary that men with a degree of maturity enroll. Students must be able to function in English.

PROCEDURE:

Candidates are requested to submit an application sufficiently early that all references may be received and checked before registration day. It is best to be approved at least a month prior to entering school. Application forms are available upon request (write, call the school office, or download from our website: www.fsop.net).

There is no minimum requirement, but one’s stability–emotionally, socially and spiritually–must be established by information from those who are well–acquainted with the applicant.

Full-time students, taking a minimum of 25 clock hours, will not be allowed to work at secular employment. Some students attend classes at night, and they do engage in average workday employment, thus creating no problems in supplying their funds for attendance in school. The student will be responsible for his own support and transportation. Neither the local church nor the school can assume financial obligations of the student while in school.

Foreign students must have a letter of acceptance from the school and a student’s permit to satisfy U.S. Government requirements before entering the country and the school.

To enter and remain in school students accepted must honor a signed agreement included in the application to do all assigned work. The same entrance requirements apply to all courses alike.

Students cannot be accepted after the school has been in session two weeks. There are two enrollment dates, in August and January. A schedule calendar with specific dates is listed in this catalog. Any exception to this must be approved by the Director.

POLICY FOR VETERANS:

The school is authorized to provide educational opportunities for veterans.

PREVIOUS CREDITS:

Credit for previous education and training will be given to students transferring to this school after being evaluated. This includes veterans and other eligible persons. These students will be placed at the level to which they have attained.

Financial

TUITION AND FEES:

There shall be no charge for tuition. All the costs of administration and instruction are to be borne by the Florida School of Preaching, Inc., and interested Christians elsewhere. This expenditure is expected to exceed $150,000 this year. The student is expected to provide only for his living expenses, transportation, books, and materials.

REFUND POLICY:

Since there is no charge for tuition or any other charges in connection with instruction, there is no need for a refund policy. Books are not subject to refund if they have been used.

FINANCIAL AID:

A limited number of scholarships are available to help qualifying students with living expenses while attending school full-time. No funds are allowed part-time students. Each year the school is able to help a number of deserving men from an endowment fund and individual gifts. Rarely is a man wholly supported from these funds. It is expected that each one provide a part of his living expenses. Some churches also help these men. Those desiring to receive financial assistance should make application by contacting the school. A personal interview will be required with the Director.

HOUSING:

Many nearby apartments and small houses are available at reasonable rates. The school will assist in finding suitable housing.

Academic Information

REQUIREMENTS & GRADUATION:

Each full-time student must attend classes at least 25 hours per week on a regular schedule for 16 weeks, making a total of 400 hours per semester. In order to graduate, each student must have attended a total of 1600 hours, according to regular class schedule.

1. Upon satisfactory completion of course requirements totaling 100 semester hours, a certificate will be granted to the graduate.

2. The student must have demonstrated proper Christian character.

3. Each student must complete satisfactorily all the prescribed courses. There are no electives in the regular curriculum.

4. An overall grade average of 2.0 (C) must be maintained.

5. Any student having an “F” or “I” on his record must remove it before graduation if the subject is needed toward qualifying for graduation.

CREDITS:

Each full-time student must attend classes at least 25 hours per week on a regular schedule for 16 weeks, making a total of 400 hours per semester. In order to graduate, each student must have attended a total of 1600 hours, according to regular class schedule.

CLOCK HOURS AND CREDIT HOURS:

Full-time students will meet for classes five days per week, Monday through Friday, for six hours per day, making a total of 30 hours each week. (Students having at least 25 hours per week may be allowed to omit optional courses as approved.) Night classes meet two and one-half hours, beginning at 7:00 p.m. and ending at 9:30 p.m., making a total of forty hours of instruction per semester. Three credit hours are equivalent to 48 clock hours and 2½ credit hours are equivalent to 40 clock hours.

FIELD WORK:

A practical part of our training is gained in campaigns conducted by our students under the direction of a representative from the school. In these campaigns, students are able to put into practice things learned in the classroom. Valuable experience is gained in mission work, personal work, and preaching. Qualified participating students in these campaigns may receive 3 hours credit. Campaigns have been held in Florida and in foreign countries.

GUIDED RESEARCH:

Qualifying students may at the discretion of the Director do guided research projects and receive up to 3 credit hours in the specified field of interest

Academic Standing

BIBLE EDUCATION CERTIFICATE PROGRAM:

The school has a regular graduation service. It awards a certificate of graduation and achievement to those success-fully completing the work. The graduates of the school are respected and used universally. Presently, the demands for graduates of the school far exceed the number enrolled.

GRADING SYSTEM:

The quality of work done by each student is expressed in the following table:

92 - 100  A - Excellent 4 QPS*
83 - 91 B - Above Average 3 QPS*
70 - 82 C - Average 2 QPS*
62 - 69 D - Low Passing  1 QPS*
0 - 61   F - Failure  0 QPS*
  I - Incomplete 0 QPS*
  WF -Withdraw while passing 0 QPS*
  WF -Withdraw while failing 0 QPS*

*QPS = Quality Points per semester

PROGRESS REPORTS:

In addition to papers returned, a grade report card will be given to each student at the end of each semester. On request progress reports will be given to those who provide support directly to the student.

SCHOLASTIC PROBATION:

Any student making below a “C” average (2.0) for any term will be placed on probation throughout the following term. He must remove probation within that time or he will be suspended for the following term. Those who are thus suspended may be readmitted after a lapse of one term, subject to approval of the Director and faculty. Any failures must be removed by repeating the course, or by completing a satisfactory project approved by the Director. "WP" designates withdrawal while passing the course. "WF" designates withdrawal while failing the course. Permanent records will be kept by the school.

Code of Conduct

ATTENDANCE:

Most classes meet three hours per week for each course. Classes meet Mondays through Fridays. Night classes meet two and one-half hours per night. Each student is expected to be in his respective class on time at every session. All necessary tardiness or absence must be arranged for with the Director and respective instructors, to be governed as follows:

1. Leave of absence Such is granted to students under conditions beyond their control, such as road hazards, weather conditions, sickness or death in the family, necessary business (official and representing the school). Military leave is recognized and excused.

2. Absences and class cuts No absence is permitted except as indicated in the above paragraph. No class cuts are excused. Each case will be reviewed by the Director and faculty committee. Anyone whose attendance is determined to be unsatisfactory will be dismissed.

3. Tardiness Being late for class will not be tolerated, except in emergencies. Three times tardy equals one unexcused absence; three unexcused absences subject one to dismissal. For each unexcused absence, the student’s final grade average will be reduced five points. A written reason for each tardiness or absence must be presented to the Director.

4. Veterans attendance policy Three unexcused absences per month will be cause for termination from course of study.

5. Make-up work Each student is held accountable for work missed due to absence for any reason, and will be required to make it up, according to demands of his respective instructor. In view of the intensive work and accelerated program of the school, any student missing as much as two weeks’ total in any one session may be asked to withdraw. He may reenter the next term or a later term.

RULES OF CONDUCT:

The following rules of conduct apply to all students:

1. All students are expected to assume proper responsibility as citizens. Any who are convicted of any violation of the law will be subject to discipline by the school.

2. Everyone is expected to deal honestly and uprightly with fellow-students, faculty, and the churches and individuals who give him financial support.

3. Any words or acts unbecoming a Christian will not be tolerated. At all times the student must conduct himself with decorum, and display proper attitude in all matters pertaining to his school work. Male and female students who may chose to date are expected to refrain from any and all open display of affection while on the school premises. Any questions relative to these stipulations should be taken up with the director.

4. Students in this school are not permitted to use tobacco in any form; any who are found doing so will be immediately dismissed.

5. Though a specific offense may not have been committed, if at any time a student’s attitude and demeanor are not in harmony with the spirit and purpose of the school, he may be asked to withdraw. This will not be subject to review by any other person or group outside the Florida School of Preaching.

DRESS CODE:

The appearance of all students must be consistent with Christian character and proper influence.

1. Coat and tie required only by students who speak in chapel during the time that they are speaking.

2. No shorts are permitted by either male or female students. Men are not permitted to wear sandals or flip-flops.

3. Hairstyles and jewelry should be such as to not hinder the student's good influence for Christ.

Special Training

ANNUAL LECTURESHIP:

Beginning the third Monday in January, the school conducts a four day lectureship on a relevant theme. Since 1975 this lectureship has had the goal of bringing in sound preachers from throughout the brotherhood in order to instruct and encourage our students, area churches, and Christians from throughout the United States and abroad. The lectureship provides our students with excellent opportunities to meet other preachers and exposure to styles of preaching and areas of interest in the preaching field.

STUDENT DAYS:

Occasionally during the semester, congregations will request our students to conduct their services on a given Sunday. This provides our students with practical experience and opportunity to make contact with other brethren. Many times these congregations will provide a meal, which often involves cultural cuisine as well as excellent fellowship.

LADIES’ CLASSES:

Wives (or future wives) of the men attending school are urged to attend the special classes planned for them. In order for the preacher or elder to do his best work, he must have the wholehearted support of his wife. These informal sessions taught by preacher’s wives offer Biblical instruction, help, and encouragement in understanding and fulfilling her role as the wife of a preacher. We encourage the women to attend as many classes as possible. Note: Because the catalog is published in advance, some dates may change. Ladies not in daily contact with the school should call the office to make sure the dates have not changed.

Courses

COURSE NUMBERS:

Each course number consists of 4 or 5 digits. The first digit indicates the class or level: 1 = first year; 2 = second year. The second digit indicates the term in which the courses will be offered. The third digit indicates the number of semester hours credit that is given for each course. The fourth and fifth digits indicate the course number.

Consider Speech 11302 as an example: the first digit indicates that it is a first–year course. The second digit indicates that it is to be taken during the first term. The third digit indicates that three credit hours will be given for the course. The fourth and fifth digits indicate the course numbers.

Advanced Restoration History (21382) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) A study of the problems and progress of the Restoration Movement in the twentieth century will be made. Principal characters involved will be studied..

Bible Geography and Archaeology (21329) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This is a detailed study of Bible lands. A knowledge of the geography and topography of these countries adds vividness and reality to the historic narrative of the Bible. Special emphasis will be given to these lands as related to events recorded in the Bible. Attention will also be directed to archaeology as various places are studied.

Bible Study Resources (21388) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) An introductory course in the use of Bible resource materials such as dictionaries, encyclopedias, commentaries, concordances, atlases periodicals, etc. to enhance a person’s study of the Bible.

Book of Acts (12318) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This is sometimes taught in conjunction with the Life of Christ 12317. The Acts of the Apostles will be the text. Together these give a comprehensive view of the life of Jesus and history of the early church.

Christian Evidences (22344) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This class is designed to prove that Christianity is the one true religion approved by God. It will be shown that man can arrive at truth, that he can know that God exists, that the Bible is the inspired word of God, and that Jesus Christ is the divine Son of God. The class will be designed to answer objections to the above affirmation, to point out religious error, to defend the faith, and above all to strengthen the faith of all.

Church Discipline (22358) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This will be a study of the discipline of God’s people. Preventative measures will be stressed along with how to proceed with the unfaithful in the church.

Church History (General) 21341 (3 hours per week—48 class hours or 2½ hours per week—40 class hours ) The purpose of this course is to give a general summary of the history of the church to modern

Church History Restoration (22342) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) A continuation of Church History 21341. This semester will deal with the decline of the medieval church, the Conciliar period, the Renaissance, the Reformation and Counter-Reformation and the rise of modern denominationalism. This is done to better focus the study of the Restoration Movement.

Church Leadership (21357) (3 hours per week—48 class hours)

This study will examine the qualifications and duties of elders and deacons, but will also place major emphasis on characteristics of church leaders in general.

Computer-based Bible Exegesis and Research #1 (21392) 3 hours per week—48 class hours

The class will consider Bible texts and topics. Insight will be gained from the original language and research required. We will guide students in gathering information from computer-based materials. We will help students to draw conclusions that the researched evidence demands. We will expect students to purchase some necessary items including Computer Software Programs for the class. (Laptops, Microsoft Office Professional, Logos Bible Software, etc.) These will serve as “Text Books” for the class. The class will be limited to full-time qualifying students, any others must be qualified by instructor. Prerequisite: Students must be able to type, have some understanding of how computers function, and know basic terminology.

Computer-based Bible Exegesis and Research #2 (22393) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) this will be a continuation of the Computer-based Bible Exegesis and Research #1 21392.

Computers and Churches (21387) (3 hours per week —48 class hours or 2½ hours per week—40 class hours) This class is designed to acquaint preachers and churches with the potential provided them by computers.

Computers and Churches (22390) (3 hours per week —48 class hours) This will be a continuation of the Computers and Churches 21387.

Cults (22352) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This is a study of the doctrines of the major cults. The student will be instructed in methods of refuting such from the Scriptures.

Debates (22367) (3 hours per week —48 class hours or 2½ hours per week—40 class hours) A detailed study of numerous debates will be made. The student will learn methods of debating. Doctrines will be studied in order to determine strengths and weaknesses of the arguments presented.

Denominational Dogmas (11331) (3 hours per week—48 class hours or 2½ hours per week—40 class hours) This is a study of the religious doctrines being taught by the denominations in Christendom. The goal is to compare these with the teaching of the Bible, that the students may better understand the denominational world.

Denominational Dogmas (21332) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) A continuation of doctrinal studies as described in course 11331.

Difficult Texts of the New Testament (22374) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This will be a sequence to the course 21373 in the Old Testament with an examination of difficult passages in the New Testament.

Difficult Texts of the Old Testament (21373) (3 hours per week —48 class hours) A study will be made of difficult texts of the Old Testament. Diverse interpretations will be studied in an effort to establish what the Bible teaches in the passage under consideration.

Educational Program of the Church (12330) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This course deals with the church as an educational institution. Specific information on how to teach or how to direct the teaching program will be given.

English Grammar (11324) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This is a course in the basics of English. The English sentence is to be studied in all its parts. Accurate sentence structure will be stressed. Special emphasis will be given to areas where most grammatical errors occur.

English Composition (12325) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This will be a continuation of English 11324, with emphasis given on writing research papers.

English (21326) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This course will be offered to second–year students who need more advanced fundamentals of English grammar. Some attention will be given to writing short themes and sentence structure.

English (22328) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) A continuation of English 21326

Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians and Philemon (12336) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This will be a textual study of these books. Some classify these as Prison epistles.

Eschatology (22376) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This is an examination of the doctrine of last things. Such items as the rapture, man of sin and antichrist, the great tribulation, and the millennium will be studied.

Ethics (22385) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This study has to do with the Christian’s Biblical base for behavior as he faces contemporary issues in the world. Great emphasis will be placed upon the fact that without the Bible there is no objective or authoritative basis for moral and value judgements.

Ezekiel (11312) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This will be a detailed study of this Old Testament book. Special attention will be given to the times and conditions of God’s people during this period.

Ezekiel and Daniel (21314) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) Special studies of these books are made with special emphasis on the text and the historical setting of the prophets. Special attention will be given to these in view of the many false claims made by some interpreters.

Ezra, Nehemiah and Esther (22315) (3 hours per week—48 class hours or 2½ hours per week— 40 class hours) These books are studied from the text of the Bible. The student is led to see how the people of God were treated in captivity. Lessons of faith are learned from those who did God’s will under difficult circumstances.

Field Work (22298) (up to 3 hours per week—48 class hours) Occasionally, evangelistic campaigns are conducted by students. In these school approved campaigns students can earn credit as they make practical application of classroom studies.

First and Second Corinthians (11335) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) A textual study is made of these two letters. The purpose is to see how principles were applied to the problems of this church that we might be better able to resolve problems in the church today.

First and Second Thessalonians (21337) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) A textual study of these books will be made.

First and Second Timothy and Titus (22338) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) A textual study of these letters will be made with a desire to understand better the role of a preacher.

General Epistles (22349) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) The books of James, John, Jude and First and Second Peter will be studied.

Genesis and Exodus (11309) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) A careful study is given to these books. Attention will be directed to their origins. Examples of obedience will be studied, that application to present day situations may be made.

God’s Prophetic Word (22347) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) In this course the Bible is discussed as a whole. It is also divided into special topics aimed at knowing the development of God’s plan throughout the ages and the consummation of the plan in the Lord’s church.

Gospel of John (22327) (3 hours per week—48 class hours or 2½ hours per week—40 class hours) The Gospel of John will be studied from the text of the Bible. The peculiar approach made in this book will be noted as it differs from the first three books of the life of Christ.

Gospel of Luke (21386) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This will be a textual study of the Gospel and may be studied in conjunction with the Book of Acts.

Gospel of Matthew (21389) (3 hours per week—48 class hours or 2½ hours per week—40 class hours) This will be a detailed study of the Gospel of Matthew with a special interest given to how this document sets forth evidence that Jesus was the Messiah, Christ foretold in the Old Testament.

Greek I (21322) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This will be an introductory course in the Greek of the New Testament. Time will be spent in vocabulary drills and elementary syntax.

Greek II (22323) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This is a continuation of course 21322 that will include a study of forms and the ability to read and translate certain passages. It will be a valuable course for any who study the New Testament in depth.

Greek III (21271) (2½ hours per week—40 class hours) This class is offered for those who have had Greek 21322 and 22323. Reading will be in the Greek New Testament.

Greek IV (22272) (2½ hours per week—40 class hours) A continuation of course 21271.

Hebrews and Galatians (21343) (3 hours per week—48 class hours or 2½ hours per week—40 class hours) This will be a study of both books, and will show how the Gospel is to be distinguished from the Law of Moses.

Hermeneutics (11300) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This deals with the science of interpretation, especially the figurative language found in the Bible. This course is of great value in showing how better to study the Bible.

Holy Spirit (22350) (3 hours per week—48 class hours or 2½ hours per week??40 class hours) A study will be made of the Holy Spirit in the Old Testament, the prophecy concerning His work in the New Testament and its fulfillment. Current positions relative to the Holy Spirit will be examined

Homiletics (21383) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) An advanced course in the art of preaching; special services such as meetings, funerals, weddings, debates, etc. will be considered.

Interpretive Reading (11263) (2½ hours per week—40 class hours) This is a study of techniques in expressive reading: Inflection, Projection, Pronunciation, and Articulation, centered around oral interpretation of Old and New Testament scriptures.

Introduction to the New Testament (22321) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This is a course in general introduction. A study will be made of the canon and text of the New Testament. A special emphasis will be placed on study of inspiration and integrity of the New Testament books.

Introduction to the Old Testament (21379) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This will be a course in general introduction to the books of the Old Testament.

Isaiah (32381) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) In a textual study of the words of this great prophet, special attention will be given to the Messianic message of the book. Fulfillment of prophecies will be studied as evidence for the inspiration and integrity of the Bible.

Isaiah and Jeremiah (12313) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This will be a detailed study of these Old Testament books. Special attention will be given to the times and conditions of God’s people during this period.

Isaiah and Micah (13311) (2½ hours per week—40 class hours) A study is made of these books with special notice being given to the condition of the nations, warnings, and prophecies of the Babylonian captivity and return. Messianic prophecies will also be considered.

Jesus and Controversy (22377) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) A detailed study of the teaching of Christ will be made. Special attention will be to consider how He met those who opposed Him.

Jesus the Master Teacher (21384) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) The methods and techniques of Jesus as a teacher will be studied.

Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy (12310) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) A careful study of these books will be made. Special emphasis will be given in a study of the priesthood. Attention will be given to the laws throughout the study of the Pentateuch. Principles will be noticed, that present–day lessons may be learned.

Life of Christ (12317) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This is a study of the Gospels. Attention is given to a harmony of the Gospels and a chronological arrangement of the events in the life of Christ. Special attention en to the moral and doctrinal teachings of Christ.

Life of Paul (21362) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) Paul, that universal person, commissioned with the universal gospel—what blessings await the diligent study of the life of this great apostle. Paul, born of Jewish parents and a Roman citizen; reared in the culture of the Greek and in the most strict sect of first century Judaism—Paul, more than any other first century person, represents what Christian fidelity demands. To understand the life of Paul is to understand Christianity, and this will be the goal of this study.

Logic (21370) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) Basic principles of deductive and inductive logic will be studied. An effort will be made to help the student make proper application of the scriptures to life.

Major Prophets (21345) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This study will survey the books of Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and Daniel. The chief work of each will be noted.

Marriage and the Family (22354) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This is a study of what constitutes scriptural marriage and the problems that break up the home. In this course study will be made of current problems that now threaten the family.

Minor Prophets (22346) (3 hours per week—48 class hours or 2½ hours per week—40 class hours) This will be a survey course of the minor prophets. The chief contribution of each will be sought that practical applications may be made.

Miracles and Parables (11316) (3 hours per week—48 class hours. Note: This is also a class that may be taught 2½ hours per week—40 class hours) This is a study of the miracles by Christ and the teaching of His parables. These will be carefully studied for proper interpretation and application.

Missions I (21355) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This course is designed to help the student see the need of missionaries in various places. The student will be challenged to examine himself in view of the particular needs of a missionary. We hope it will also motivate many to become better evangelists.

Missions II (22356) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) A continuation of 21355. Detail will be given to the everyday work of the missionary. Many of the problems peculiar to his work will be studied.

Music for Song Leading (11333) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This will be a study of the fundamentals of singing in worship. Time will be spent in learning and executing basic principles of singing. The student will learn how to conduct congregational singing and build a foundation for reading music.

New Testament Church (12351) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This study of the church includes the prophesies that foretold it, its establishment, and its early history, as well as the worship and organization of the church. A look at some of the doctrinal problems that have confronted the church through the ages will be made.

Old Testament History (21339) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) The books from Joshua through Second Kings will be studied, with the aim being to familiarize the student with the history of Israel from the point of the conquest of Canaan through the reign of the kings and the period of captivity.

Pentateuch (11364) (3 hours per week—48 class hours or 2½ hours per week—40 class hours). A careful overview is given of the Pentateuch, calling attention to principles that present-day lessons may be learned.

Personal Evangelism (11320) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This is a practical study of various techniques in doing personal evangelism. Time will be spent in learning basic facts to be presented and the best methods for given situations. Practice sessions will be conducted from time to time.

Practical Work of the Church (11306) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This study deals with qualifications and work of elders and deacons. The preacher and his work will also be given some attention.

Preacher and His Work I (12307) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This semester more time will be given to daily work of the local preacher. Attention will be given to the local congregation and the special problems that face the preacher in that setting.

Preacher and His Work II (12308) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This is a continuation of course number 12307.

Preparation and Delivery of Sermons (22303) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This study is sometimes called “homiletics.” Sermon outlining will be studied. Effective presentation of various types of sermons will be studied and practiced. The basic speech course may be taken before enrolling in this class.

Psalms I (21368) (3 hours per week—48 class hours or 2½ hours per week—40 class hours) The Psalms are classified and studied with particular emphasis on their content, literary beauty, style, and Messianic import.

Psalms II (21369) (3 hours per week—48 class hours or 2½ hours per week—40 class hours) A continuation of 21368.

Psychology of Counseling (22353) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This is a study of the basic concepts and techniques of counseling. Preachers are faced with many problems in local work. For the most part they are not prepared to give sound advice. This course is designed to offer some suggestions in this respect.

Revelation (21359) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) A textual study will be made along with the different approaches to the book. Dates for writing will be examined.

Romans (21361) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This will be a textual study of this great epistle. The student is to see how the gospel is emphasized as the means of salvation.

Scheme of Redemption (12319) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This is a study of God’s plan for man and will be used as a factual study in preparing for personal work.

Sermon on the Mount (21380) (3 hours per week—48 hours or 2½ hours per week—40 class hours) This will be a detailed study of the Sermon on the Mount. Lessons will be taught from the principles set forth in Matthew 5 through 7.

Sermon Outlines I (11304) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) Sermons will be studied with attention given to both the content and the presentation. A number of themes will be considered and some current issues will be examined.

Sermon Outlines II (12305) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This is a continuation of course number 11304.

Special Problems and Issues (22378) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) The church has always had problems. Time will be spent in the study of problems that existed in the early church as well as problems faced by the church today. Biblical solutions will be sought in each case.

Speech (12302) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) In this study the fundamentals of public speaking will be reviewed. Practice sessions will be conducted that the student might master the art of speaking and attention will be given to voice improvement, articulation, and pronunciation.

Survey of the New Testament (22340) (3 hours per week—48 class hours or 2½ hours per week—40 class hours) A survey of the New Testament will be made. A review of the life of Christ, history of the first century church, and major doctrines in the epistles will be considered.

Survey of the Old Testament (21360) (3 hours per week—48 class hours or 2½ hours per week—40 class hours) This is a survey of the thirty-nine books of the Old Testament. Our aim is to acquaint the student with the writers and general contents of each book.

Systematic Theology (21266) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This course seeks to give a good understanding of the topics of God, Christ, Man, the world, redemption, eschatology, et al.

Topical Studies (11334) (3 hours per week—48 class hours) This study will be in outline form of various Bible topics that need special consideration.

Wisdom Literature Poetry (21348) (3 hours per week—48 class hours or 2½ hours per week—40 class hours) This is a textual study of Job, Ecclesiastes, Proverbs, Song of Solomon.

World Religions (21375) (3 hours per week—48 class hours or 2½ hours per week—40 class hours) In order to understand mankind, one needs to understand his religion. This course will examine some of the major religions. Missionaries especially will profit from this study. Each religion will be reviewed by the teaching of the Bible.

Textbooks & Materials

Cost:

The cost of textbooks and materials for regular courses will average about $85.00 to $150.00 per semester. The following books are representative of those books used during the two-year program. Prices vary. Check with the school before purchasing to be sure the book will still be used.

General:

Subjects listed below are subjects where books have been used in addition to class notes. Instructors’ notes are used in many classes. When available, these notes may be purchased from the school.

 Bible: King James, New King James, or American Standard Versions

 Commentaries: Gospel Advocate Commentaries are used in many Bible classes along with the instructor’s notes.

 Christian Evidences:

  • Josh McDowell. Evidence That Demands a Verdict:Volume 1: Historical Evidences for the Christian Faith. San Bernardino, CA: Here’s Life Publishers, 1988.
  • Thomas B. Warren. Have Atheists Proved There Is No God? Jonesboro, AR: National Christian Press, 1972.

 Church History:

  • Earle C. Cairns. Christianity Through the Centuries. 3rd ed. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1996.
  • F. W. Maddox. The Eternal Kingdom: A History of the Church of Christ. Delight, AR: Gospel Light, 1961.

 Cults:

  • Anthony A. Hoekema. The Four Major Cults. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1963.
  • Walter Martin. The Kingdom of the Cults. Revised by Hank Hanegraaff. Minneapolis, MN: Bethany House Publishers, 1997.

 Denominational Doctrines:

  • Mead, Franklin S. Handbook of Denominations in the United States. 10th ed. Revised by Samuel S. Hill. Nashville, TN: Abingdon, 1995.
  • Moffitt, Jerry. Denominational Doctrines. Portland, TX: Moffitt Publications, 1996.

 English I:

  • J. Martyn Walsh and Anna Kathleen. Plain English Handbook. 9th ed. Columbus, OH: SRA/McGraw-Hill, 1987.
  • J. Martyn Walsh and Anna Kathleen. Plain English Workbook. 9th ed. Columbus, OH: SRA/McGraw-Hill, 1987.

 English II:

  • Joseph Gibaldi. MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. 5th ed. New York: Modern Language Association of America, 1999.

 Ethics:

  • Norman L. Geisler. Christian Ethics: Options and Issues. Grand Rapids: Baker, 1989.

Greek:

  • William D. Mounce. Basics of Biblical Greek. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1993.
  • William D. Mounce. Basics of Biblical Greek Workbook. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1993.
  • Ray Summers. Essentials of New Testament Greek. Revised by Thomas Sawyer. Nashville, TN: Broadman and Holman, 1995.

 Hermeneutics:

  • D. R. Dungan. Hermeneutics. Delight, AR: Gospel Light, n.d.
  • Terry M. Hightower, ed. Rightly Dividing the Word. Vols. 1 and 2. San Antonio, TX: Shenandoah Church of Christ, 1990 and 1991.
  • Thomas B. Warren. When Is An Example Binding? Jonesboro, AR: National Christian Press, 1975.

 Holy Spirit:

  • Wendell Winkler, ed. What Do You Know About the Holy Spirit? Montgomery, AL: Winkler Publications, 1980.

 Introduction to the New Testament:

  • D. A. Carson, Douglas J. Moo, and Leon Morris. An Introduction to the New Testament. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1992.

 Introduction to the Old Testament:

  • Gleason L. Archer. A Survey of Old Testament Introduction. Rev. ed. Chicago: Moody Press, 1994.

 Life of Christ:

  • J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. The Fourfold Gospel. Bowling Green, KY: Guardian of Truth, n.d.

 Logic:

  • Thomas B. Warren. Logic and the Bible. Jonesboro, AR: National Christian Press, 1982.
  • Douglas J. Wilson. Introductory Logic. 3rd ed. Moscow, ID: Canon Press, 1992.

 Major Prophets:

  • Homer Hailey. A Commentary on Isaiah. Grand Rapids: Baker, 1985.
  • R. K. Harrison. Jeremiah and Lamentations: An Introduction and Commentary. Tyndale Old Testament Commentaries. Vol. 19. Ed. D. J. Wiseman. Downers Grove, IL: Inter-Varsity Press, 1973).
  • James E. Smith. The Major Prophets. Old Testament Survey Series. Joplin, MO: College Press, 1992.

 Marriage and the Family:

  • Thomas B. Warren. Marriage Is For Those Who Love God . . . And One Another. 1962. Moore, OK: National Christian Press, 1994.
  • Thomas B. Warren and Garland Elkins, eds. The Home As God Would Have It And Contemporary Attacks Against It. Glasgow, KY: National Christian Press, 1979.

Minor Prophets:

  • Homer Hailey. A Commentary on the Minor Prophets. Grand Rapids: Baker, 1972.

 Pentateuch:

  • James E. Smith. The Pentateuch. Old Testament Survey Series. Joplin, MO: College Press, 1992.

Preacher and His Work:

  • Lyles, Cleon. Bigger Men for Better Churches. Little Rock, AR: Cleon Lyles, 1962.

Restoration History:

  • Hailey, Homer. Attitudes and Consequences. Bowling Green, KY: Guardian of Truth, 1975.
  • William Woodson. Standing for Their Faith: A History of Churches of Christ in Tennessee. Henderson, TN: J and W Publications, 1979.

 Revelation:

  • Homer Hailey. Revelation: An Introduction and Commentary. Grand Rapids: Baker, 1979.
  • Ray Summers. Worthy Is the Lamb. Nashville, TN: Broadman, 1951.

 Romans:

  • Robertson L. Whiteside. A New Commentary on Paul’s Epistles to the Saints at Rome. 1945. Denton, TX: Inys Whiteside, 1961.

 Sermon Design and Delivery:

  • John A. Broadus. On the Preparation and Delivery of Sermons. 4th ed. Revised by Vernon L. Stanfield. San Francisco, CA: Harper Collins, 1979.
  • Tom Holland. Sermon Design and Delivery. Brentwood, TN: Penmann Press, 1988.
  • Tom Holland. Preaching: Principles and Practices. Brentwood, TN: Penmann Press, 1988.

 World Religions:

  • Norman Anderson. The World’s Religions. 4th revised ed. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1975.
  • Winfried Corduan. Neighboring Faiths. Downers Grove, IL: Inter-Varsity, 1998.

NOTE: THIS IS BY NO MEANS A COMPLETE LIST OF THE BOOKS USED. TEXTBOOKS MAY VARY WITH TEACHERS FROM YEAR TO YEAR.